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Analysis of Compost
Compost

Background

Compost can be defined as decomposed organic matter. It can be produced from a wide variety of organic feedstocks. Many composts are produced from municipal green (garden) wastes. The composting process can involve reducing the particle size of the biomass and then placing it in mounds where the composting is allowed to take place over an extended period of time. Fully composted material can, in some cases, be suitable for addition to soil.

As part of a research project funded by the Irish Environmental Protection Agency, Celignis founder Daniel Hayes has collected, processed, and analysed (using both chemical and near-infrared techniques) a number of different compost samples.


Analysis of Compost at Celignis


Celignis Analytical can determine the following properties of Compost samples:

If you would like us to analyse your Compost samples then please select the appropriate analysis packages from our list.

Cellulose Content of Compost

The composition of compost will depend on the organic material that has been used to produce it and the time and extent of the composting process. Taking the example of compost produced from horticultural waste, there will be a significant variation in composition according to the time of year. For example, in the summer the majority of garden wastes are likely to be of grasses (lawn cuttings) or the cuttings of bushes (small twigs and leaves) rather than bulky woody materials. In contrast, in the winter months the relative proportion of woody materials might be expected to increase.

In his EPA-funded research project, Celignis founder Daniel Hayes found that an increased period of comosting was associated with a lower cellulose content.

Click here to see the Celignis Analysis Packages that determine cellulose content.



Hemicellulose Content of Compost

The hemicellulose content of compost will depend on the organic material that has been used to produce it and the time and extent of the composting process.

Click here to see the Celignis Analysis Packages that determine hemicellulose content.



Lignin Content of Compost

In his EPA-funded research project, Celignis founder Daniel Hayes found that an increased period of composting was associated with an increased lignin content.

Click here to see the Celignis Analysis Packages that determine lignin content.



Starch Content of Compost

The starch content of compost will depend on the composting time, with the value decreasing as the composting time increases.

Click here to see the Celignis Analysis Packages that determine starch content.



Uronic Acid Content of Compost

Uronic acids are present in many of the feedstocks that are used to generate compost, however we are not aware of any studies to date on the fate of these uronic acids during the composting process.

Click here to read more about uronic acids and to see the Celignis Analysis Packages that determine uronic acid content.



Ash Content of Compost

The ash content of compost is likely to increase with increased degradation of the organic matter.

Click here to see the Celignis Analysis Packages that determine ash content.



Heating (Calorific) Value of Compost

The heating value of compost will depend on the organic material that has been used to produce it and the time and extent of the composting process. Composts can have lesser heating values due to their high ash and moisture contents.

Click here to see the Celignis Analysis Packages that determine heating value.



Bulk Density of Compost

At Celignis we can determine the bulk density of biomass samples, including Compost, according to ISO standard 17828 (2015). This method requires the biomass to be in an appropriate form (chips or powder) for density determination.

Click here to see the Celignis Analysis Packages that determine bulk density.



Basic Density of Compost

At Celignis we can determine the basic density of some suitable biomass samples. The method requires the biomass to be in an appropriate form (chips) for density determination.

Click here to see the Celignis Analysis Packages that determine basic density.

 

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